Long Island Civil Rights Attorneys Protect Employees from Discrimination

Long Island civil rights attorneys see many cases each year that involve various types of discrimination. Despite the existence of laws requiring equal treatment of all individuals, there are thousands of complaints filed with the EEOC alleging workplace discrimination. There are also thousands of lawsuits filed in court alleging discrimination in and out of the workplace.

Long Island civil rights attorneys like the ones at Leeds Brown focus their civil rights practice on cases involving equality and discrimination. If you are being harassed or discriminated against, contact our attorneys for assistance. Our attorneys take great pride in protecting the rights of New Yorkers, and we have been doing so for decades.

We have the dedication and skill to secure the best outcome to which you are entitled. Long Island civil rights attorneys at Leeds Brown have recovered millions of dollars in damages for discrimination clients over the years and understand the challenges that come with the filing of a discrimination claim. We can compassionately and patiently guide you through the process and help you begin to recover financially and emotionally.

What are Long Island Civil Rights?

Civil rights also refer to the rights of individuals to receive equal treatment under the law and be free from discrimination in various settings based on certain characteristics. Several federal laws were enacted over the years to strengthen the right to equal treatment. These laws prohibit discrimination in areas such as employment, housing, lending, providing credit and voting.

  • Title VII of The Civil Rights Act of 1964: addresses the right to be free from workplace discrimination based on one’s religion, sex, race, color, and national origin.
  • The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): Protects individuals with disabilities from various types of discrimination including education, access to public accommodations and employment.
  • The Equal Credit Opportunity Act: Makes it unlawful for creditors to discriminate against credit applicants by religion, marital status, color, national origin, race, age or sex or because an applicant receives public assistance.
  • The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA): Prohibits employers from discriminating against employees and job applicants who are 40 and older, based on age
  • The Equal Pay Act: Requires that employers pay all employees equally for equal work, regardless of whether the employees are male or female.
  • Pregnancy Discrimination Act: Prohibits employment discrimination against female employees and applicants who are or intend to become pregnant — including discrimination in hiring, failure to promote, and wrongful termination.
  • Voting Rights Act: Prohibits the denial or restriction of the right to vote, and forbids discriminatory voting practices nationwide.

What are Some Examples of Civil Rights Violations?

Under Title VII and other laws, discrimination exists when an employment decision is made based on a protected characteristic such as age, sex, race or religion. For example, it may be discrimination if your boss fires you because you are non-Christian or refuses to promote women.

Also, everyone should receive equal treatment when it comes to paying, providing opportunity, training, hiring, and firing. For example, it may be discrimination if your employer only offers computer training to workers under 30 or pays men and women different rates for the same work.

Discrimination cases are in the news almost daily and shed some light on how discrimination looks in “real life.” Some examples include:

  • Recently, five female employees who sued a large retail chain for sex discrimination settled their claims and dismissed their lawsuit against the corporation. The initial case launched a class action lawsuit joining 1.5 million women. The original litigation alleged that female employees were discriminated against based on their gender, on pay and promotion to management positions—in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.

    Six women from the original class filed a motion seeking to assert their right to pursue their civil rights. They allege that without the original lawsuit, there is no one left to protect their interest as part of the class. The women allege, among other things, that a manager stated that women don’t seek management jobs because of “family commitments” and that they are justified in paying men higher salaries because they were the “heads of their households.” One plaintiff claims she heard a manager state that women are too weak for management roles and that they “are just bitches.” Still another plaintiff was allegedly told to “doll up” to make herself more “promotable.”

  • In another part of the country, a teacher is suing a school district for employment discrimination for refusing to hire her for a new position based on her race. The particular classroom she applied to teach in required the teaching of Spanish for one hour each day. The teacher claims she was fully qualified for the job but that she did not speak Spanish.

  • In her lawsuit, she claims that the school could have brought someone in to do that small part of the job. The teacher alleges that, because non-Spanish speaking Caucasians are the minority in her district, the policy requiring Spanish speaking teachers, affects whites disproportionately. She further states that after refusing to hire her for the job she wanted, the principal retaliated against her by doubling her workload. As the result of the retaliation, she was “provided a less desirable position and has damages including emotional pain, suffering, inconvenience, mental anguish, [and] loss of enjoyment of life.

  • Elsewhere, a recently filed lawsuit alleges that an aerospace company is forcing workers out of their jobs in violation of age and disability discrimination laws. The lawsuit claims that certain workers are receiving inaccurate and unduly negative performance reviews to justify the firings. All of the terminated employees involved in the lawsuit are over 40. They allegedly have family members with medical conditions which could cost the company a lot of money under their self-funded insurance plan. The plaintiffs, in this case, allege that the company is unlawfully discriminating against them because of their ages and because they have family members with disabilities.

Contact Long Island Civil Rights Attorneys for Help with Your Discrimination Claim

Have you been fired from your job for a discriminatory reason? Has someone refused to hire you for a job for which you are qualified? Does the company you work for refuse to promote certain individuals or treat different groups of employees unfairly? If you are experiencing discrimination of any kind, you should speak to experienced Long Island, civil rights attorneys at Leeds Brown. Each case is different, and we can’t guarantee results, but contacting Leeds Brown is the first step toward understanding your civil rights and working to protect them.

Call us today for a free case evaluation. Let the Long Island civil rights employment discrimination attorneys at Leeds Brown help you seek monetary damages, reinstatement, and any other relief to which you may be entitled. You can reach someone at our office 24/7 by calling 1-800-585-4658.