New York City Race Discrimination Attorneys Help Protect Workers’ Rights

New York City race discrimination attorneys, such as the ones at Leeds Brown, dedicate themselves to protecting workers’ rights. If you have experienced workplace harassment or discrimination because of your gender, race or disability, we can help you understand your options. You may be able to file a claim against your employer and recover damages.

At Leeds Brown, our New York City race discrimination lawyers have a proven record of success in and out of the courtroom. Our firm takes a collaborative, and hands-on approach to all matters and our team works tirelessly to secure the best possible outcome for our clients. Race discrimination cases can be complex and emotional. Our attorneys have the compassion, sensitivity, and determination required to achieve outstanding results in New York race discrimination cases.

If you think your employer has committed an act of discrimination against you, you may be entitled to a variety of damages such as back pay, reinstatement, promotion, or hiring. You may also be able to recover a monetary award for your emotional pain and suffering or punitive damages. Punitive damages are large awards designed to punish the employer and deter future discriminatory behavior.

We have found that victims of race discrimination in New York City often ask some important questions. Below are some of those most frequently asked along with brief answers. For more information or questions about your particular case, please call our office. We are available seven-days-a-week, twenty-four-hours-a-day at 1-800-585-4658.

  1. What is race discrimination?

    Race discrimination occurs when someone is treated differently based on their race. In the context of employment, race discrimination can exist when a person is paid differently, promoted differently, fired or harassed.

  2. What laws protect against race discrimination?

    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act is a federal law that prevents employment discrimination based on race. It makes it illegal to discriminate based on race in:

    • hiring
    • firing
    • disciplining
    • distributing benefits
    • promoting
    • compensating
    • training
    • any other condition or privilege of employment

    In New York, employees are also protected from race discrimination by New York State Human Rights Law.

  3. Who do race discrimination laws protect?

    If you work for employers with 15 or more employees, you are protected. These employers are bound by Title VII. These employers include private employers, state and local governments, and educational institutions. Labor organizations and employment agencies must also act in compliance with Title VII.

    New York State Human Rights Law also protects workers in New York City and New York State. Under state law, employers with 4 or more employees may not discriminate based on race.

    The legislation also prohibits discrimination against and protects job applicants. In other words, an employer may not refuse to hire you because of your race.

  4. Can I be discriminated against because of the color of my skin?

    Race discrimination includes discrimination based on skin color and any other physical feature or characteristic associated with a particular race.

  5. Can I be discriminated against by someone who is of the same race as I am?

    Racial discrimination can occur between people of the same race. There is no requirement under the laws that the parties be of different races.

  6. Are racial jokes or slurs discrimination?

    Sometimes. Simple teasing or the occasional joke are not prohibited because they generally do not rise to the level of harassment, even if they are inappropriate. However, if you can prove that the jokes or slurs are so pervasive as to create an offensive or hostile working environment, or they result in a negative employment decision, you may have a discrimination claim.

  7. Is it discriminatory to require me to perform a certain kind of job or work in a particular territory because of my race?

    Yes. An employer may not limit, segregate or classify employees or job applicants based on race in a way that may deprive them of employment opportunities or adversely affect their employment status. For example, under Title VII, you may not be isolated from customer contact because of your race. Title VII also prohibits employers from things like assigning only minority salespeople to largely minority territories or classifying one race of workers differently than another, even though they perform the same job.

  8. Can a job application ask me to identify my race?

    Generally, no. The law presumes that any pre-employment inquiry that discloses or tends to disclose an applicant’s race will be used to make a hiring decision. If hiring excludes minorities, a pre-employment inquiry of this type will be used as evidence of discrimination.

  9. Is race ever a legal qualification for a certain job?

    Rarely. There is an exception to Title VII that says if race is a bona fide job qualification, it may be used as a factor in an employment decision. It is very difficult for an employer to prove this and there are very few circumstances where race will be considered a bona fide qualification.

  10. What is the difference between race discrimination and racial harassment?

    Racial harassment is considered a form of race discrimination.

  11. Who enforces the law?

    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is the federal agency that investigates charges of racial discrimination in employment under Title VII.
    In New York, the Division of Human Rights is the state agency that handles charges under state anti-discrimination laws.

Contact New York City Racial Discrimination Attorneys for Free Case Review

The New York City attorneys at Leeds Brown can help determine if you have a race discrimination claim against your employer and gently guide you through the process of filing a complaint, gathering evidence, and making a strong case. Contact our office today at 1-800-585-4658 and speak with an experienced New York City race discrimination lawyer.