How Do You Ask for a Reasonable Accommodation?

To ensure that you are not discriminated against when requesting a reasonable accommodation, knowing what qualifies as such is important. Though the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) doesn’t specifically define what constitutes a “reasonable” request, there are some guidelines for determining whether or not your request meets this standard. This article will provide you with information about how to identify and ask for reasonable accommodations in accordance with the ADA and other laws.
Asking for reasonable accommodation is not something to be taken lightly. You should only seek one if you require it for mitigating your condition, and the task that needs completion for this to happen cannot reasonably be done without an adjustment of some sort.
For example, someone whose disability hinders their ability to use their hands may need a reasonable accommodation to complete forms necessary for an academic program. In this case, the person would not be able to complete these tasks without either assistance from someone else or using a computer.
What to look for;

Is there a similar person with the same disability and similar work?
To ensure that your request is indeed considered “reasonable,” you should ask yourself whether or not another individual who does not have your disability could perform the task in question. This means that if another person were to complete this same assignment, would it cause them an unreasonable amount of harm? If you answer “no,” then it is likely not a reasonable request.

Reasonable accommodation requests shouldn’t surpass requirements for the task.
Additionally, your accommodation should be no more than what is required for someone else to do the same job or attend school without suffering undue hardship. This means that the accommodation should not cause more difficulty for you or your institution than if another student completed this assignment or attended classes without a disability. For example, someone with PTSD may need to take extra time during exams due to their condition, but they would still be able to meet all of their deadlines even while working on this requirement.

Proof of need for accommodation
You should only seek one if you require it for mitigating your condition, and the task that needs to be done for this to happen cannot reasonably be done without an adjustment of some sort. To ensure that your request is indeed considered “reasonable,” you should ask yourself whether or not another individual who does not have your disability could perform the task in question.

General reasonable types of accommodation- Specific examples

  • Reserved parking/Disabled parking
  • Flexible work schedule/Working from home
  • Use of a computer/Assistance in completing forms
  • Reassigning vacant positions- only if existing employees are not available for reassignment
  • Modified training schedule- only when necessary and does not fundamentally alter the nature of the position.
  • Increase work accessibility

Dialogue between employer and employee is key to

If you decide to request a reasonable accommodation, it is important that your employer knows what they need to be successful. The best way to attain this goal is by having an open dialogue with the individual, so both parties know exactly what needs have been fulfilled.
If there are any misunderstandings or miscommunication, it is likely that your request will not be fulfilled or may even be denied.

More information on how to seek a reasonable accommodation can be found here.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life. This includes jobs, school and housing situations, among other things.
If you need a reasonable accommodation for your disability, it is important to know what kind of documentation and proof may be required. This varies depending on the reason why you are seeking this accommodation in the first place. Be sure to contact both an ADA lawyer and someone who can help advocate for special education rights if necessary so that you know what you will need to do to be successful.

Conclusion

Asking for a reasonable accommodation can be intimidating, but remember that you are not asking to receive special treatment or aid simply because of your disability. You are only asking for an adjustment so that you may have equal access and opportunity in school or at work, just as everyone else does. While the process is different depending on where you live

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