Controlled on Duty Time

Truck drivers need to know the difference between Controlled on Duty Time and Uncontrolled On Duty Time. These two terms are defined by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) as time spent driving or working with a loaded or unloaded vehicle that is in motion. FMCSA limits how long truckers can stay behind the wheel without taking time off, which they call “restarting” their clock. However, these rules are flexible if you’re using your vehicle instead of business-owned equipment.

Controlled On Duty Time

This means that all hours spent driving or working with a loaded or unloaded vehicle in motion count against your limit unless you take an off-duty period of at least eight consecutive hours.

Uncontrolled On Duty Time

If you are using your vehicle, all time you spent driving counts against the 14-hour limit on-duty not involving driving and the 70-hour weekly limit. This means that if you go more than eight hours in a day or work more than 11 hours in a day, you will exceed your 14-hour duty limit not involving driving.
Truck drivers need to know the difference between Controlled On Duty Time and Uncontrolled On Duty Time. These two terms are defined by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) as time spent driving or working with a loaded or unloaded vehicle that is in motion. FMCSA limits how long truckers can stay behind the wheel without taking time off, which they call “restarting” their clock. However, these rules are flexible if you’re using your vehicle instead of business-owned equipment.

Activities considered to be on duty

-Unsurpassed spent at a plant, delivering/getting an office, terminal, or another office of an engine transporter, except if you are in your sleeper billet or have been calmed of all business-related responsibilities.
-All-time examining or adjusting your truck, including energizing it and washing it.
-All driving time.
Record-breaking stacking, dumping, overseeing, or going to your truck; or taking care of desk work for shipments-
-All-time spent giving a breath, salivation, hair, or pee test for drug/liquor testing, including travel to and from the assortment site
-All-time spent accomplishing some other work for an engine transporter, including giving or getting preparing and driving an organization car.
-All-time spent accomplishing paid work for any individual who is anything but an engine transporter, like low maintenance work at a nearby café.

What is DOT Hours of Service?

DOT Hours of Service (HOS) is a set of rules and regulations that control commercial truck drivers’ amount of time behind the wheel. The FMCSA limits how long truckers can stay behind the wheel without taking time off, which they call “restarting” their clock. However, these rules are flexible if you’re using your vehicle instead of business-owned equipment.

DOT Hours of Service Rules for Controlling On Duty Time

The DOT’s HOS rules apply to drivers who operate commercial motor vehicles (CMV) in interstate commerce and certain local goods movement operations. They set limits on how much time a trucker can spend driving and work, with a break between those two actions defined as “off duty.”
-After the first eight hours of on-duty time in a day, you must be allowed at least ten consecutive hours off duty.
-You can drive only if it has been more than eight total hours since your last off duty or sleeper-berth period of at least 30 minutes.
-You can work only if it has been more than eight total hours since your last off duty or sleeper-berth period of at least two consecutive hours.

What are Uncontrolled Hours of Service?

Uncontrolled HOS rules apply to drivers who operate commercial motor vehicles (CMV) in intrastate commerce and certain local goods movement operations. These trucks must have a sticker that states the driver’s HOS limits.
-Uncontrolled drivers can continue to work beyond their 14-hour limit on-duty, not involving driving if they use their vehicle instead of business-owned equipment.
-Drivers cannot drive after having been on duty for 70 hours in any period of eight consecutive days.
-Drivers cannot drive after having been on duty for 80 hours in any period of 30 consecutive days.
-Drivers can work beyond their 14-hour limit on-duty, not involving driving if they use their vehicle instead of business-owned equipment, but only when no other drivers are available to operate the car.
-The 14-hour limit on-duty not involving driving does not apply to drivers who are at home in their sleeper berth, but only if the truck is parked or stopped and it’s impractical for them to leave while they’re sleeping.

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