More than a dozen states, including New York, are considering enacting laws that would allow victims to seek compensation from employers and pressure them to stop bullying in the workplace. Bullying in the workplace can include behavior ranging from verbal abuse by a supervisor to cruel comments and teasing by a co-worker. Many lawmakers and taxpayers are supporting the measure to secure such protection in the workplace. However, business groups like the US Chamber of Commerce have opposed attempts at other anti-bullying laws because they contend that the legislation would lead to an increase of frivolous lawsuits. According to a management association survey, 56% of companies already have some kind of anti-bullying policy mentioned in an employee handbook or code of conduct. Full article.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 makes it illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex. Sexual discrimination involves treating someone (an applicant or employee) unfavorably because of that person’s sex. The law forbid such sexual discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment. Please visit the EEOC’s website for further information: eeoc.gov.

Leeds Brown Law PC dedicates a large portion of its practice to the area of employment discrimination. The firm has represented individuals throughout Long Island and the New York City area in matters of sexual harassment and sexual discrimination. For more information, contact Leeds Brown Law at 1-800-585-4658 for a free consultation or visit lmblaw.com.