Sharon Osbourne has chosen to decline the offer to return as a judge for “America’s Got Talent.” The decision was made after NBC’s handling of a potential casting for her son Jack on the network’s new show, “Stars Earn Stripes.” Osbourne’s 26-year-old son was fired from the program after he revealed his multiple sclerosis diagnosis, and that the decision was delivered via email two days prior to his start date. Osbourne then decided to leave “America’s Got Talent.” Osbourne has been quoted as saying, “It’s discrimination, and it was badly handled.” NBC Entertainment Chairman Bob Greenblatt has refuted the discrimination claim. Full article.

The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, state and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications. The ADA does not specifically name all of the impairments that are covered, but common examples of disabilities include confinement to a wheelchair, reliance on assistive devices such as canes and walkers, blindness, deafness, a learning disability, and certain kinds of mental illness. The ADA states that a business entity shall not discriminate against a qualified individual with a disability. This applies to job application procedures, hiring, advancement and discharge of employees, workers’ compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment. For more information: ADA Website

Leeds Brown Law, PC practices in matters of employment discrimination throughout Long Island and the New York City area. For more information, contact Leeds, Morelli and Brown, PC at 1-800-585-4658 for a free consultation.