A controversy over Olympic competitor’s hijab sparked an outpour of complaints across the globe. The International Olympic Committee, International Judo Federation and Saudi officials had agreed that Wojdan Shaherkani, a female Saudi Arabian judo fighter, is allowed towear a headscarf during her matches.
Shaherkani had signed an agreement with Saudi Olympics officials that she could compete only if she wears “correct and approved” clothing that “sticks to Islamic principles.” This year is the first time every nation competing in the Olympics is sending women as well as men. Saudi Arabia was the last country to announce that it would send female athletes. Full article.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 makes it illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex. Unless it would be an undue hardship on the employer’s operation of its business, an employer must reasonably accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs or practices. This extends to such things as dress or grooming practices that an employee has for religious reasons. These might include, for example, wearing particular head coverings or other religious dress (such as a Jewish yarmulke or a Muslim headscarf), or wearing certain hairstyles or facial hair (such as Rastafarian dreadlocks or Sikh uncut hair and beard). It also includes an employee’s observance of a religious prohibition against wearing certain garments (such as pants or miniskirts). When an employee or applicant needs a dress or grooming accommodation for religious reasons, he should notify the employer that he needs such an accommodation for religious reasons. If the employer reasonably needs more information, the employer and the employee should engage in an interactive process to discuss the request. If it would not pose an undue hardship, the employer must grant the accommodation. Please visit the EEOC’s website for more information: EEOC.

The attorneys at Leeds Brown Law, PC believe that discrimination at work, or anywhere else, has no place in a free and democratic society. Leeds Brown Law, PC has won precedent-setting decisions involving employment discrimination for clients represented on Long Island, throughout the New York City area. For a free consultation, please Contact Leeds Brown Law, PC at 1-888-585-4658.  at One Old Country Road – Suite 347, Carle Place, NY, 11514-1851