Patty Tipton Company Agrees settles religious discrimination claim

In Kentucky, the Patty Tipton Company, which is a local staffing agency in the state, will settle a religious discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The lawsuit alleged that a female applicant, Megan Woodard, who applied for a temporary job at the 2010 World Equestrian Games (WEG) held in Lexington, Kentucky, was not employed by the agency because she would not wear pants on the job, citing to religious reasons. The girl is a college student who is a member of a fundamentalist Baptist church in which members believe that women should not dress like men. This means women would not be allowed to wear pants. Read more: http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/release/9-4-12e.cfm

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 makes it illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex. In a case such as the one above regarding religion, harassment can include, for example, offensive remarks about a person’s religious beliefs or practices. Although the law doesn’t prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that aren’t very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive environment. See: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/religion.cfm

The attorneys at Leeds Brown Law, PC have won precedent-setting decisions involving discrimination for clients represented on Long Island, throughout the New York City area and from other parts of the country as well.  For a free consultation, please Contact Leeds Brown Law, PC at 1-800-585-4658