A study at the Indiana University School of Medicine has found that minority teenage boys smoke more when they suffer discrimination...

A study at the Indiana University School of Medicine has found that minority teenage boys smoke more when they suffer discrimination, which is not so for teenage girls in the same situation.  The study included 2,561 black and hispanic teens between the ages of 12 and19 who are living in low-income households in Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles and New York.  After the study, about 25% of the teenage boys reported discrimination within the previous six months. As a result, 12% said they had smoked within the previous 30 days. See: http://www.drugs.com/news/discrimination-may-lead-smoking-boys-22193.html.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 makes it illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex.  It is unlawful to discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of his/her race or color in regard to hiring, termination, promotion, compensation, job training, or any other term, condition, or privilege of employment. Please visit the EEOC’s website for more information: www.eeoc.gov/policy/vii.html.

Leeds Morelli & Brown, PC is a nationally recognized firm in the area of discrimination law.  If you or someone you know has suffered discrimination, a hate crime, or bias in the Long Island or New York City area, contact Leeds, Morelli and Brown, PC at 1-800-585-4658 for a free consultation.